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Killing the Sky: Oral Histories from Horizon Academy, Rikers Island: Volume 2

Killing the Sky: Oral Histories from Horizon Academy, Rikers Island: Volume 2

Synopsis

Student-inmates of Rikers Island's high school, Horizon Academy, use the methodology of oral history to capture and reflect upon their life stories of personal struggle.

About

In Killing the Sky 2, the student-inmates of Rikers Island's high school, Horizon Academy, discover their voices and the craft of storytelling. Excavating their lives before prison, these students write about lost loved-ones and friends, the allure of the streets after dark, the uproot of moving from city to city - as if describing former lives, former selves. And, each life has its gifts: a young niece to raise right, a math teacher who listened, the goal still possible. Just as these students find the courage to write beyond stigma and silence, readers will find richly human, stirring reflections.

Curriculum Embedded Project

Since 2004, curriculum consultants from the Student Press Initiative have worked closely with the students at the Horizon Academy at Rikers Island to capture in writing their stories of personal struggle and reflection. Using the methodology of oral history, the students' pieces come alive as they share their life histories in their own words. This is Volume 2 in the series.

Specifications

  • Author: Horizon Academy Students 2005-06
  • Price: 14.95
  • Year of Publication: 2006
  • Binding: Paperback
  • # of pgs.: 105

Reviews

"The writers of Killing the Sky speak with passion, pain and desire for a world not yet. The stories in this volume are sculpted out of the clay of human possibility and from the soil of social oppressions. Filled with reflection, responsibility and hope, these essays are a call to action - for the young elders - a reminder that the struggle is never over and we are so much stronger working together than drowning alone. I thank the writers for their honesty, prose, deep reflection and humor. The essays are a gift, and leave readers with the question - where is our accountability to the next generation?"

Michelle Fine, Distinguished Professor of Psychology, Urban Education and Women's Studies, The Graduate Center, CUNY